Strawberry Season is Here

The last few years I have been growing everbearing strawberries out in one of the raised beds. The yields were disappointing, so last spring I replaced them with June-bearing strawberries. I didn’t get any strawberries last year, but that is expected and even good for the plants. It’s best to pull off the blooms the first year if you get any, that lets the plant put all its energy into establishing a strong root system. Strong roots will help the plants produce more and larger fruit for years to come. June came and so have the berries – they are bigger than the everbearing and abundant! These were from the first harvest last week, now we are bringing in two big bowls every other day or so.

Another strawberry I really enjoy is the Pink Panda. They are much smaller than the June-bearing and have beautiful little pink flowers throughout the growing season sometimes followed by tiny sweet strawberries. Pink Pandas were introduced to the US from England way back when the kids were little, maybe the early 80’s. They are fun to add to hanging baskets (or a whole basket of just pandas) plus they are a great addition anywhere around the yard for ground cover. Beware, they have a lot of long runners (runners are a horizontal stem that grows above ground, which  grow new plants) so you may have to keep them under control. 

Some of the leaves are starting to get a little pale so I am keeping a close eye on them. I think I might need to supplement the soil but need to do a little research. I planted four types of the June-bearing plants but did not label the rows, now I don’t know what type each plant is, or what any of them are really, since I didn’t make notes in my garden notebook. A disappointing error but not uncommon for the Buchanan garden.

Know who doesn’t mind the pale leaves? The local blacktail deer. They are the smallest of the four species that are indigenous to this area. They live around the coast and on the islands of Western Washington. I saw them wandering around in the spring and caught a quick picture.

This evening I went out to check on the patch and noticed I am now sharing ¼ of the bed with the deer. What is really weird is they ate the foliage but left all the berries – here is a picture of what is left from the visit. 

So far we have just been cutting up the berries and macerating them with a little sugar. They have been delicious over vanilla ice cream, Nancy likes to add some whipped cream. We had so many yesterday, we sent some to a friends house and tomorrow morning we will have another large crop. A good problem to have. 

What do you do with your extra strawberries? We need some ideas before we are overrun. 

15 thoughts on “Strawberry Season is Here

  • June 15, 2020 at 10:22 am
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    Welcome Larry! So wonderful to “see” you here. I know the goal of every pic is to make me jealous and you’re doing a great job! I harvested 4 very small strawberries today. That bring my total harvest of strawberries this year to 5. So yeah, I’m jealous!

    And I can’t answer the question about what to do with an abundance of strawberries from personal experience but fresh strawberry pic would be amazing. I used to love Marie Callender’s fresh strawberry pie (almost as good as their fresh peach pie).

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    • June 15, 2020 at 10:41 am
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      What is fresh strawberry pic?

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      • June 15, 2020 at 10:47 am
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        Fresh strawberry pie! Would blame auto correct but that was totally me, lol.

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  • June 15, 2020 at 10:25 am
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    Wow! Amazing pics! I can practically smell the strawberries!

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    • June 15, 2020 at 10:48 am
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      I’d rather taste them lol.

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      • June 15, 2020 at 10:50 am
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        Of course! They look plump and juicy!

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  • June 15, 2020 at 11:12 am
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    Incredible!! Don’t forget to freeze some…either whole or with sugar, then you can enjoy them all year long! Beautiful garden..

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    • June 15, 2020 at 1:02 pm
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      Great idea, my sister in law also recommended freezing them. Thank you.

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  • June 15, 2020 at 11:40 am
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    Love strawberries! Growing advice is always appreciated!

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  • June 15, 2020 at 4:17 pm
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    I love that! This is the first time I’ve ever read a blog! Lol. You can always put them over pancakes. Waffles or French toast and they are delicious in lemonade. I also have a really good easy recipe for freezer jam. Keep on gardening!

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    • June 19, 2020 at 1:51 pm
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      You will have to get us that freezer jam recipe! Right now we have tons of macerated berries we are eating with ice cream every night.

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  • June 15, 2020 at 4:30 pm
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    Love this post! It makes me wish I had a yard to grow stuff in. I might try one plant on my apartment balcony, but I can’t go crazy with stuff that will need to be brought inside when it gets cold here in Virginia. Can you suggest a good container variety of strawberry?

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    • June 19, 2020 at 1:52 pm
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      I will do a little research and get back with you Cheryl.

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  • June 15, 2020 at 4:39 pm
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    Gorgeous photos! We are about to be in the berries ourselves over here on the other side of the state, as usual we are running behind ya’ll. This spring has been a cold wet one and that is probably a big part of why your leaves look like that. We feed with composted steer manure every other year or so and substitute with Osmocote Flower and Vegetable in between. Our favorite strawberry variety is Mara des Bois. Also, Strawberry Jam is a super easy way to use up extra berries that you have 😀

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    • June 19, 2020 at 1:54 pm
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      Thanks for the pointers Aimee. We aspire to have a nice bed like you.

      Reply

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